A revamp has given the ASX good looks, matched with a great price. While entry-level models can be snapped up new from £16,250, the one on test here is the 1.6 diesel ‘5’, with an asking price of £27,205. Inside, the model has leather seats, LED mood lighting and satnav. Considering the price, you’ll be impressed, especially if you buy the diesel. It’s a very good engine, with decent power at low revs. This is great for day-to-day driving and makes the ‘5’ versatile, whether around town or on a A revamp has given the ASX good looks, matched with a great price. While entry-level models can be snapped up new from £16,250, the one on test here is the 1.6 diesel ‘5’, with an asking price of £27,205. Inside, the model has leather seats, LED mood lighting and satnav. Considering the price, you’ll be impressed, especially if you buy the diesel. It’s a very good engine, with decent power at low revs. This is great for day-to-day driving and makes the ‘5’ versatile, whether around town or on a motorway cruise. It can be a bit rattly, though – it’s not the most refined of engines.
While the ASX can iron out creases in the road, it isn’t the comfiest car in its class. The steering isn’t the best either, with a distinct lack of feedback. In terms of practicality, the ASX offers 442 litres of boot space and there’s enough room for five-up.
Fuel economy could be better, though. The diesel ‘5’ managed mid-40s mpg (though it claims 56.5mpg) and, in 2018, you’d expect something with a 1.6 litre engine to do better, even if it is connected to a 4x4.
In reality, though, the ASX is still an inexpensive car with many positive points. What’s more, it wears its looks better than competitors such as the Nissan Qashqai, and SEAT Ateca.